By continuing to browse our site, you are consenting to the use of cookies.
Click here for more information on the cookies we use. Hide

Quick Links

Research

We regularly commission research into a wide range of trends and markets relating to the phone-paid services industry. We look at both consumer behaviour and the direction of the market. Below are our latest pieces of research.

A study of consumer journeys relating to online competition and adult PRS (PDF)

In June 2016 Craft concluded a commissioned study on online competition and adult premium rate services, exploring the consumer journeys from a consumers' perspective.

2015 Annual Market Review (PDF)

We commissioned mobilesquared to conduct the PRS Annual Market Review 2015. The review takes an in depth look at the PRS market and its component parts and assesses the outlook for both in 2016. The review should interest anyone who requires an independent view of the state of the PRS market.

Vulnerability An open discussion

The premium rate services market is changing. While some services are experiencing a challenging operating environment, services like giving, gaming and gambling are becoming increasingly prevalent in our market. As a regulator, we’ve been thinking about what these changes mean for consumers, particularly those that are vulnerable. 

2014 Annual Market Review (PDF)

We commissioned mobilesquared to conduct the PRS Annual Market Review 2014. The review takes an in depth look at the PRS market and its component parts and assesses the outlook for both in 2015. The review should interest anyone who requires an independent view of the state of the PRS market.

Premium rate service-based consumer credit research (PDF)

In addition to the requirement for a general understanding of how consumers would engage with the PRS-based model, PhonepayPlus wanted to understand consumers' understanding of specific elements of the consumer credit service. This included an exploration of consumers' contextual understanding of the purpose of the second call to the PRS-based consumer credit service, expectations of getting an earlier decision on loan applications and overall perceived value of the second call. 

The future for phone-paid digital goods and services (PDF)

PhonepayPlus commissioned a study from Deloitte looking at the short and medium-term outlook for premium rate services in a changing market, to understand better the trajectory of the market and, with UK consumers forecast to spend c. £14 billion on digital content in 2019, in particular to identify whether this provided the potential for growth, the scenarios for how that growth might evolve and what the enablers of and barriers to that growth might be.

Understanding consumer journeys (PDF)

We often hear from the consumers who get in touch with us that they have had difficulty getting information about their premium rate services (PRS) and resolving issues they have had with their bill. We commissioned this research in order to really understand the issues and then assist us with improving the consumer experience.

The impact of the spending caps review on customers of premium rate services (PDF)

PhonepayPlus' responsibilities include setting the maximum amount that PRS users can spend on a call. Currently this limit is set at £30.65. Ofcom regulates the cap on the price per minute that service providers can charge; this is currently set at £1.53, but Ofcom has recently decided to increase this to £3.60. PhonepayPlus is reviewing overall spend limits. To support this process, PhonepayPlus asked Analysys Mason to research spending caps specifically in connection with „live‟ PRSs. 

The impact of the spending caps review on premium rate services aimed at children (PDF)

For services aimed at children there is currently a limit of £3.07 for one-off purchases. PhoneplayPlus was reviewing this limit as well as assessing the need for a possible cumulative monthly spend limit. It commissioned Analysys Mason to assess survey evidence in support of this process.

If you would like to access previous pieces of research please visit the Research Archive

 Did you find this information useful?
If so, please share using the buttons below…